28 4 / 2013

We made a flyer!

We made a flyer!

28 4 / 2013

Ain’t it beautiful?

Ain’t it beautiful?

13 10 / 2012

When we were conceiving of this operation, we dreamed not just of bringing amazing pizza to the streets, but of remaining true to the value-oriented model that typifies most food trucks.  We had noted the recent trend of gourmet food trucks pricing their goods as if they were the restaurant they aspired to be and not a humble lunch truck, and while we admired the ambition of these trucks, something didn’t feel right about charging well over $10 for lunch from a truck.  We resolved to offer food as good as you can get at any sit-down pizza place in the city, but at a cost that would leave you feeling like you got a great value.  In short, it was and still is our goal to serve you the best pizza in the city at prices well below the competition.

When we set our prices a year ago, however, we lacked some crucial information.  We didn’t know the precise rate at which we would be able to get pies out the window.  We didn’t know how much demand there would be for our pies, and how that demand would vary from day to day and location to location.  And though we had heard stories, we didn’t quite understand just how time-consuming it is to prepare for a simple 3-hour service.

Fast forward a year, and we have all this figured out.  We now know how many pies we can move in a hour; that those numbers vary widely by location and drop precipitously if it’s rainy or too cold or too hot; that we don’t add many more tickets by showing up for lunch early or staying late; and that it takes from early morning until well into the evening simply to produce a 3-hour lunch service.  The problem is that, though we are doing the best we can and though we are supported by many loyal customers (shout-out to all yall!  We love you!), and though the press has been as good as we could have hoped for, we are still not making much money.  We pay our employees well, and we are just barely scratching by.

So we are faced with a difficult choice: either raise prices, taking them past the $10 ceiling we so wanted to avoid; or risk going out of business.  We know that we will upset and alienate many of you either way, but we figure we are doing the best for everyone by inching the price of each pie up $1.50.  We hate doing this, but it’s just what we have to do to stay in business.

So prices are going up—$8 for the cheapest pie and $10.50 for the priciest.  We hope you will still feel, as we do, that you are getting a top-flight pie at prices several dollars below the competition.  
We are grateful for your business and hope to see you at the truck soon,
Pitruco
p.s. This is still a learning process for us (setting prices and everything else). We always welcome your thoughts and feedback: pitrucopizza@gmail.com.

31 1 / 2012

Just a few more pics to look at from our Pop-up dinner earlier this month, courtesy of the wonderful Row Home Eats.

Just a few more pics to look at from our Pop-up dinner earlier this month, courtesy of the wonderful Row Home Eats.

19 1 / 2012

Here are some shots of from last week’s dinner party, courtesy of the generous and talented Nathan Fong.  The final menu was:

-crostini: tuscan chicken livers; “winter bruscetta” (roasted tomato, pickled cuke)

aperitif: prosecco, grapefruit, maple syrup, peychaud’s

-salad of herbs, grapes, pickled shallots, boucheron cream

-chilled consomme of onion, pancetta and tomato; pecorino whipped cream; pizza crust

-pizza with chanterelles, taleggio and prosciutto

Procrastinator IPA from Mellody Brewing

-intermezzo: chilled grapefruit with maple syrup and bitters

-sous-vide lamb belly with black garlic balsamic; lamb rib & cannelini stew; chard with apples, onions and kumquats; roasted carrot

Colosi, Nero D’Avola Sicilia, 2008

-apricots stewed in wine; whipped mascarpone; crushed amaretti

-petit fours: kumquat chips with zabaglione; salted chocolated almonds

Grappa di Barbera, Mazzetti

A big thanks to all who came out!  See you next time,

pitruco

09 1 / 2012

An initial glimpse at the menu for our 1/14 Pop-up dinner at the new commissary in Mt. Airy.  5 courses, plus a few bites here and there.  Optional beverage pairing, featuring a terrific IPA from Mellody Brewing.  We’re pulling out all the stops!  Space is limited, so email us (pitrucopizza@gmail.com) or call our hotline (484-602-5454) to book or for more information.  -Pitruco

An initial glimpse at the menu for our 1/14 Pop-up dinner at the new commissary in Mt. Airy.  5 courses, plus a few bites here and there.  Optional beverage pairing, featuring a terrific IPA from Mellody Brewing.  We’re pulling out all the stops!  Space is limited, so email us (pitrucopizza@gmail.com) or call our hotline (484-602-5454) to book or for more information.  -Pitruco

23 11 / 2011

We’re starting to use our pizza oven to make breads, once it’s cooled down a bit after a pizza service.  A few kinks still need to be worked out, but you can start expecting to find our wild-yeast breads for sale at our LOVE Park location, Mondays and Wednesdays.  Stay tuned.

We’re starting to use our pizza oven to make breads, once it’s cooled down a bit after a pizza service.  A few kinks still need to be worked out, but you can start expecting to find our wild-yeast breads for sale at our LOVE Park location, Mondays and Wednesdays.  Stay tuned.

10 11 / 2011

It’s a brand new ballgame: Our proofing box is in the house.  



We pride ourselves on our crust—it’s airy, blistered, crispy and chewy, all at once.  We like our dough to rise real slow, but in our unheated commissary space, it’s proven difficult to coordinate the variables that rise the dough: yeast, time, and above of all, temperature.  Because we can’t control how cool our commissary gets, we’ve had to rely on guesswork to anticipate how long to let the dough rise and how much yeast to add.  Mostly we’ve gotten lucky and nailed it, but on a few unfortunate occasions we’ve made off with under-fermented dough that’s not quite ready to show that “Signature Pitruco Puff.”  Under-fermented dough is harder to stretch, takes longer to cook, and can come off as somewhat gummy, and nobody should ever have to eat a gummy pie.



So we went and built ourselves a proofing box.  Clad with insulation and heated with a ceramic light and thermostat designed for a reptile cage (no joke!), we can now precisely regulate the dough’s temperature and keep it from getting too cool.  And this means reliable Pitruco Puff, day after day after day.

20 10 / 2011

Drexel last Tuesday night.  We’ve been loving dinner—the truck looks great under our new lights, and we get to slow it down a bit and chat with our diners.  

Drexel last Tuesday night.  We’ve been loving dinner—the truck looks great under our new lights, and we get to slow it down a bit and chat with our diners.  

12 10 / 2011

The Sausage: This one sees sausage from the Italian market get formed into meatballs and placed beside caramelized onions, roasted mushrooms, and a bechamel sauce loaded up with grana padano.  Tastes almost desserty.  $8.50

The Sausage: This one sees sausage from the Italian market get formed into meatballs and placed beside caramelized onions, roasted mushrooms, and a bechamel sauce loaded up with grana padano.  Tastes almost desserty.  $8.50